SIX FABOLOUS FUDGES!

FUDGE FOR THOSE WHO CAN’T GO WITHOUT

HERE’S A FEW FUDGE RECIPES FOR THE ULTIMATE FUDGE LOVERS!

Old-Fashioned Classic Fudge

This is a true cream-and-butter fudge, with more chocolate in it
than is usual. The nuts can be omitted, if you wish. I store this in
the refrigerator, but please let it come to room temperature before
serving, as the fudge will have much better flavor if you do so. It
also freezes nicely.

Do not consider attempting this fudge unless your relative humidity is at 50% or lower.

3 cups granulated sugar

1-1/3 cups heavy cream

1/3 cup light corn syrup

Pinch salt

6 ounces unsweetened chocolate, very finely chopped

3 Tbsp. cold unsalted butter, cut into bits

2 tsp. vanilla

1 cup chopped, toasted, cooled pecans OR walnuts

In your food processor fitted with the steel blade, process sugar at
highest speed in 3 “bursts” of about 15 to 20 seconds each until sugar
is very fine-textured. (This step is optional, but it makes dissolving
the sugar a much easier job.)

In a heavy 4-quart pot, butter the sides in a 2-inch path 3 inches
from the bottom.  (This will retard sugar crystals from forming during
cooking.

Pour processed sugar into the pot and add cream, corn syrup, and
salt.  Place over low heat and stir constantly with a wooden spoon
until sugar is dissolved; mixture should not come to a boil during this
process, which may take 8 to 10 minutes or more.

When the sugar is completely dissolved, increase the heat to medium.
Add the chopped chocolate and stir often until it is melted and
incorporated.  Stir occasionally until mixture comes to a boil. Attach
your calibrated candy thermometer and continue to cook until it reached
236 degrees (F).

Watch the boiling mixture very carefully for the first few minutes,
adjusting the heat to maintain a full, but not rolling boil.  I stir
the boiling mixture every 2 to 3 minutes until the final temperature is
reached to prevent scorching.

When the fudge reaches 236 degrees (F) on the thermometer, remove
from heat. Place the pot into a large bowl filled with ice and water.
Add the cold butter bits and vanilla, but do not stir in.   The fudge
should cool undisturbed until the temperature falls to 110 degrees F.

While the fudge cools, prepare the pan and utensils. Line an 8 inch
square pan (at least 1-1/2 inches deep) with a double layer of
heavy-duty aluminum foil. With soft butter, very lightly butter the
foil.  Have the nuts and a large wooden spoon nearby.

When fudge has reached 110 degrees (F), remove from ice water and
place pot on a dish towel or pot holder on a flat surface. Begin to
stir/fold the fudge gently with the wooden spoon. This is a stiff
mixture, and it will take a couple of minutes to incorporate the melted
butter, but keep at it. Stir thoroughly, but it is not necessary to
beat or to stir continuously. I take frequent breaks for 30 seconds or
a minute at a time. Periodically, scrape the spoon, the pot bottom, and
the pot sides no more than 1/3 of the way up from the bottom with the
buttered spatula.

Continue stirring for approximately 15 to 20 minutes (and the drier
the day, the quicker setup will occur). Toward the end of this stirring
phase, you’ll notice several changes. The fudge will stiffen slightly
and begin to lose its gloss. It will “snap” with every stroke of the
spoon, and you may feel it give off heat. When the gloss begins to
leave and the mixture begins to “snap”, quickly stir in the nuts just
until evenly distributed, and turn into prepared pan, scraping out the
bottom of the pot and the sides no more than 1/3 of the way up from the
bottom. It is helpful to butter your hands lightly and press the fudge
out to make an even layer in the pan. Cool completely to room
temperature.

To cut, lift out block of fudge, still in foil, from the pan. Peel
back foil sides. Use a large, very sharp, heavy, straight-edged knife
to cut the fudge into 36 or more pieces; it will be necessary to clean
the knife frequently under hot water, then dry it off, to keep the cuts
neat. I wrap each piece individually in plastic wrap so it will not dry
out. Store between sheets of waxed paper in an airtight container in
the refrigerator for up to two weeks, or freeze for longer storage.
Always allow the fudge to come to room temperature before serving.

Note: Occasionally, when I make this, after I’ve
turned it into the 8 inch pan, a thin layer of butterfat will show up
on the surface as the fudge cools. If this happens, just blot the
butterfat up gently with a paper towel.

And remember while you are stirring/folding the fudge, that the
reason why you are going through this effort is to prevent the crystals
from forming large masses…each stir/fold is reducing their size!

No-Beat Chocolate Fudge

(a/k/a Marshmallow-Creme Fudge)

12 ounces of semi-sweet chocolate chips or finely chopped chocolate

1 7-ounce jar of marshmallow creme

1 23-ounce can evaporated milk

1/2 cup unsalted butter

4 cups granulated sugar

2 cups coarsely chopped pecans or walnuts, if desired

Line a 9×13-inch baking dish with heavy-duty aluminum foil and butter the foil  well.  Set aside.

In a large bowl, place your chocolate pieces and marshmallow creme and set aside.

In a heavy 4-quart pan, combine the milk, butter and sugar.  Place
over medium heat and stir constantly with a wooden spoon until the
sugar is completely dissolved.  Clip on your candy thermometer and
bring the mixture to a full boil until it reaches 234 degrees (F).
This will take approximately 6-8 minutes.

Pour the  syrup over the chocolate and marshmallow creme.  Using a
wooden spoon, stir the mixture until all is well blended, smooth and
creamy.  Stir in the nuts.

Pour the mixture unto your prepared pan, spreading the mixture
smooth on the top.  Allow to rest undisturbed for 4 hours until the
fudge reaches room temperature.

Lift the fudge from the pan using the foil, spread the edges of the
foil carefully away from the sides of the fudge.  Using a clean, sharp
knife, cut the fudge into 1-inch squares, frequently cleaning your
knife under hot water and drying well.

Store between sheets of waxed paper in an airtight container in the
refrigerator for up to two weeks, or freeze for longer storage.  Always
allow the fudge to come to room temperature before serving.

Peanut Butter Fudge

This fudge is an absolute favorite of young people.  And it may be
rolled into balls and used as centers for dipping into tempered
chocolate for outstanding candies!  If gifting this fudge, be certain
to notate that it contains peanut butter to protect those who may be
allergic to same!

1 1/4 cups whole milk

1/4 cup light corn syrup

1/4 cup unsalted butter

1/4 teaspoon baking soda

3 cups granulated sugar

1 cup lightly packed light brown sugar

3/4 cup creamy or chunky peanut butter

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Line a 9×13-inch dish with heavy-duty aluminum foil and butter the foil well.  Set aside.

In a heavy 4-quart pan, combine the milk, corn syrup, butter, baking
soda and sugars.  Place over medium-high heat and stir constantly with
a wooden spoon until the mixture comes to a full boil.

Clip on your calibrated candy thermometer and continue to cook, stirring constantly, until the syrup reaches 236 degrees (F).

Remove the pan from heat and allow to cool undisturbed until the
mixture reaches 110 degrees (F).   Add the peanut butter, vanilla and
nuts.  Stir gently with a wooden spoon until the mixture becomes creamy
and begins to lose its gloss.  This will take about 15-20 minutes, so
feel free to take a few breaks along the way.

When the mixture is losing its gloss and begins to “snap” with each
stroke of the wooden spoon, pour the fudge into your prepared pan and
smooth the surface.  Allow to cool to room temperature (about 4
hours).  Then cut into 1-inch squares.

Store between sheets of waxed paper in an airtight container in the
refrigerator for two weeks, or freeze for longer storage.  Always allow
the fudge to come to room temperature before serving.

Vermont Maple Fudge

2 cups Grade B Amber Maple Syrup

1 tablespoon light corn syrup

3/4 cup light cream

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

3/4 cup chopped walnuts

Line an 8×8-inch dish with heavy-duty aluminum foil and butter the foil well.

In a heavy 4-quart pan over medium heat, combine the maple syrup,
corn syrup and cream and stir constantly until the mixture begins a
full boil.  Clip on your calibrated candy thermometer and cook the
syrup until it reaches 236 degrees (F).

Remove the pan from the heat and allow to cool undisturbed until the
mixture reaches 110 degrees (F).  Add the vanilla extract to the
mixture.

Begin to stir/fold the fudge gently with the wooden spoon. This is a
stiff mixture, and it will take some time to finish to the proper
consistency.  Stir thoroughly, but it is not necessary to beat or to
stir continuously. I take frequent breaks for 30 seconds or a minute at
a time. Periodically, scrape the spoon, the pot bottom, and the pot
sides no more than 1/3 of the way up from the bottom with the buttered
spatula.

Continue stirring for approximately 15 to 20 minutes (and the drier
the day, the quicker setup will occur). Toward the end of this stirring
phase, you’ll notice several changes. The fudge will stiffen slightly
and begin to lose its gloss. It will “snap” with every stroke of the
spoon, and you may feel it give off heat. When the gloss begins to
leave and the mixture begins to “snap”, quickly stir in the nuts just
until evenly distributed, and turn into prepared pan, scraping out the
bottom of the pot and the sides no more than 1/3 of the way up from the
bottom. It is helpful to butter your hands lightly and press the fudge
out to make an even layer in the pan. Cool completely to room
temperature.

To cut, lift out block of fudge, still in foil, from the pan. Peel
back foil sides. Use a large, very sharp, heavy, straight-edged knife
to cut the fudge into 36 or more pieces; it will be necessary to clean
the knife frequently under hot water, then dry it off, to keep the cuts
neat. I wrap each piece individually in plastic wrap so it will not dry
out. Store between sheets of waxed paper in an airtight container in
the refrigerator for up to two weeks, or freeze for longer storage.
Always allow the fudge to come to room temperature before serving.

Buttermilk Fudge

This is an old fudge recipe without chocolate.  Buttermilk gives this fudge a delicious, rich tang!

1 cup Bavarian-style buttermilk

1/2 cup unsalted butter

3 tablespoons light corn syrup

1 teaspoon baking soda

2 cups granulated sugar

1 tablespoon vanilla extract

2 cups coarsely chopped pecans or walnuts, if desired

Line a 9-inch dish with heavy-duty aluminum foil and butter the foil well.  Set aside.

In a heavy 4-quart pan, combine the buttermilk, butter, corn syrup,
baking soda and sugar.  Place over medium-high heat and stir constantly
with a wooden spoon until the sugar completely dissolves and the
mixture comes to a full boil.

Clip on your calibrated candy thermometer and cook, stirring
constantly, to 236 degrees (F).  Remove from heat and allow the pan to
rest undisturbed until the temperature cools to 210 degrees (F).  Add
vanilla and nuts and stir until the mixture is creamy (about 5 minutes).

Pour into your prepared pan and allow to cool for 4 hours until it is at room temperature.  Cut into 1-inch squares.

Store between sheets of waxed paper in an airtight container in the
refrigerator for two weeks, or freeze for longer storage.  Always bring
to room temperature before serving.

Scottish Tablet

The Scots have a sweet tooth, for certain. Tablet is their
traditional version of Fudge and preceded our own traditionally
chocolate version by a few centuries… Definitely creamy, smooth and
toothsome and recommended highly to accompany any other fudges you make
be making. A lovely contrast. Here is my great-grandmother’s
treasured recipe modernized for the US and today’s cooking methods:

1 ¼ cup Whole Milk

2 ½ cups granulated sugar

¼ cup unsalted butter

3 tablespoons dark, “bottom of the pot” (very strong) coffee or espresso

In a heavy 4-quart pan over low heat, bring the milk slowly to a
boil stirring often to prevent scorching.  Add the sugar and butter and
stir constantly until the sugar is dissolved and the mixture returns to
a boil. Clip on your calibrated candy thermometer, raise the heat to
medium and bring to a full boil.

Continue to boil steadily, stirring occasionally, for 15-20 minutes, until the temperature reaches 240 °F.

Remove the pan from the heat. Stir in the strong coffee and leave the fudge undisturbed until it has cooled to 110 °F.

While the fudge cools, prepare the pan and utensils. Line an 9-inch
square pan (at least 1-1/2 inches deep) with a layer of heavy-duty
aluminum foil, extending the foil over the edges of the pan to use as
“handles” for removing the fudge later. Lightly butter the foil.

Once the tablet has cooled, begin to fold and stir the tablet with a
large wooden spoon until it just begins to lose its gloss and is thick.
(This will probably will take 15-20 minutes, so feel free to take a
few-seconds’ break every now and then.) When the tablet is nearing the
point where it is ready to pour into the pan, you will notice a loss in
gloss, it will stiffen slightly and will begin to “snap” with every
stroke of the spoon/spatula. When it does…

Transfer to the prepared 8” pan and spread evenly across the top.
Allow the tablet to rest for 4 hours and come to room temperature.

When completely cooled, remove the tablet from the pan by lifting
the foil and pull the foil from the tablet sides. Use a sharp knife and
cut the fudge into 1-inch squares, frequently cleaning the knife in hot
water and drying completely.

Store between sheets of waxed paper in an airtight container in the
refrigerator for two weeks or freeze for longer storage.  Always bring
to room temperature before serving.

I HOPE THESE RECIPES SUFFICE YOUR GREATEST FUDGE CRAVINGS AND PLEASE DO LET ME KNOW HOW THEY HAVE COME OUT AND IF THEY ARE AS YUMMY AS THEY LOOK!

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2 Responses to “SIX FABOLOUS FUDGES!”

  1. […] SIX FABOLOUS FUDGES! […]

  2. Thank you for your great fudge recipes (I think- I haven”t tried them yet) but appreciate your fine effort & time The only fudge I ever made was called “MILLION DOLLAR FUDGE” by Mamie Eisenhower when I lived in USA in the 1970’s – when I was in my 20’s (shows how old I am) I recall I had to stir,stir & stir by hand – the longer the better the fudge Yes it was yummy but I’ve never bothered again till now that I have decided to do home made/baked goodies for Christmas pressies & I am checking out website for recipes THANK YOU once again Merry Christmas, Krystyna

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